Mathematics Department

Philosophy

The Mathematics Department's multilevel college preparatory curriculum stresses reasoning, solving problems, and applications to real-world situations. Our courses are vertically aligned in order to provide a seamless transition from lower-level to upper-level classes. Students acquire skills gradually and methodically, allowing easy movement from fundamental to significantly more difficult levels. 

Graduation Requirements: 3.0 credits. Required classes are Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. Students who complete Algebra I or Geometry in middle school may obtain high school credit for these courses.

A Sampling of Classes

List of 7 items.

  • Advanced Topics in Mathematics (Weighted)

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    Our most advanced Math class, this full-year course will introduce students to college-level mathematics. Topics covered will include rigorous logic and proofs, linear algebra, calculus of several variables, topology, and abstract algebra.

    Prerequisite: Calculus AB or Instructor Approval

  • Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    This course will review and expand the thoughts and ideas about linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. New concepts that are introduced include step,ogarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students will apply trigonometry skills to solve real world problems including estimating heights of large objects and loudness and pitch of sound waves. This  course  also  provides  an  important  study  on  collecting and analyzing  data  with  statistics  packages. Graphing calculators along with other hands-on applications tools are integrated to enhance the students’ problem-solving skills.
     
    Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry
  • Accelerated Algebra/Geometry

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    Semester 1 – Algebra: This course develops algebraic skills through multiple perspectives—analytically, graphically, and numerically. There is a focus on analyzing functions, particularly linear and quadratic functions, in a variety of contexts. Core skills are built on for later math classes, including work with exponents, fractional expressions, basic right trigonometry, and complex numbers. An emphasis is placed on algebraic problem-solving skills, conceptual understanding of mathematical situations, and graphical analysis of functions (including the use of the Geometer’s Sketchpad program).

    Semester 2 – Geometry: This course covers topics in plane geometry—parallel and perpendicular lines and planes, congruence and similarity in two and three dimensions; coordinate geometry; and some review of algebra and trigonometry. Geometry approaches this material in a more visual and intuitive way than Accelerated Geometry, with less emphasis on formal proof. The course emphasizes problem-solving, pattern recognition, algebraic geometry, and constructions. Both dynamic geometry software and traditional compass and straightedge are utilized for construction and conjecturing.

    Prerequisites:  Placement Exam and Algebra 1
     
  • AP Calculus AB

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    Calculus AB is a course in single-variable calculus that includes techniques and applications of the derivative, techniques and applications of the definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Algebraic, numerical, and graphical representations are emphasized throughout the course.
     
    Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus, Instructor Approval, and Grade Requirement
     
     
  • AP Calculus BC

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    Calculus  BC is a course in single-variable calculus that covers  all the  topics  from  Calculus  AB plus  a number of additional topics including parametric, polar and vector functions, improper integrals, infinite series, and polynomial approximations of functions. Algebraic, numerical and graphical representations are emphasized throughout the course.

    Prerequisites: Honors Pre-Calculus, Instructor Approval, and Grade Requirement
     
  • AP Statistics

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    This course introduces students to four themes: exploring data (observing patterns and departing from patterns); planning a study (deciding what and how to measure); anticipating patterns (producing models using probability theory and simulation); and statistical inference (confirming models). In addition to calculator-based computation and graphical  organization  of  numerical  data,  there  is  a strong  emphasis  on  explaining  statistical  procedures  and numerical results in clear, correct English.
     
    Prerequisites: Algebra II or Honors Algebra II, Instructor Approval, and Grade Requirement
  • Statistics

    Credit Earned: 1.0
    This  course  introduces  students  to  four  themes:  exploring  data  (observing patterns  and  describing  data  sets); planning  a  study  (using  statistical procedure  to  analyze  data  sets  with  graphs  and  computations);  anticipating patterns (producing models using probability theory and simulation); and statistical inference (confirming models and learning to make decisions based on data). In addition to calculator based computation and graphical organization of numerical data, there is a strong emphasis on explaining statistical procedures and numerical results in clear, correct English.

Mathematics Department Faculty

List of 5 members.

  • Pat Brown 

    Math Instructor
  • Caitlyn Hanson 

    Math Instructor
    University of Texas - B.S.
  • Ms. Jennifer Tracey 

    Mathematics Instructor
    University of Central Arkansas - M.A.
    Texas State University - B.S.
  • Benjamin Ortiz 

    Honors Algebra 2 Instructor/ Head Football Coach
    512 328-2323, ext. 239
    St. Edward's University - M.A.T
    Bethel College - B.S
  • Mackey Smith 

    Statistics & Pre-Calculus Instructor
    Trinity University - B.S.